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School Counselors Explain 5 Signs A Teen Is Under Peer Pressure

School Counselors Explain 5 Signs A Teen Is Under Peer


Peer pressure is commonplace today, especially among teenagers. The pressure can come from verbal or nonverbal influences. Additionally, a little bit of external force can be a good impact, or it can have a detrimental effect.

Since this is such a powerful influence in your child’s life, it’s something that you need to understand to help them. Under the control of this pressure, your child can make bad decisions that can cost them dearly. How does peer pressure affect your teenager, and how do you, as a parent, know when to step in and help?

Let’s assume your child suddenly takes an interest in working out at the local gym to bulk their muscles. This once couch laden teen has joined a group of kids at school who want to better their health. In this scenario, the influence of others is positive because your child is making changes to better their body.

Now, what if your child is caught smoking cigarettes or vaping behind the school with her friends? She felt the pressure from others to do something that can have a detrimental effect on her health.

Yet, she willingly did it because she succumbed to the urgings from others to try something new and dangerous. It’s easy to see that peer pressure can have different effects on your teen, but why is it such a powerful influence?

The Power of Suggestion

Your child goes through various developmental phases as they grow. As a baby, your son or daughter learned that you would take care of all their needs, and they trust you. However, when children reach their teenage years, they try to break away from your influence to form a sense of self.

Your child no longer holds your values in the same light as they did before, as now, they are more inclined to listen to their peers. Your kid needs to fit in at school. Teenagers are at a developmental stage where friends are of the utmost importance, making them more influential than you.

Why is Peer Pressure so Nerve-Wracking?

Let’s assume that your daughter is very wasteful and likes to litter. If she starts hanging with a group of earth-conscious friends, they will pressure her to change her ways. She may change and begin to recycle, picking up any trash she sees lying on the ground, and stop her wasteful habits.

In this instance, the social pressure she feels has influenced her to make positive changes. However, when you find a vape kit in your son’s backpack, you are sure that peer pressure is the invisible enemy you fight. He’s making a very destructive choice.

He knows that smoking and vaping can be harmful to his system. While his brain can register the danger, he can’t comprehend the risks he puts his body in at this point. As your children are growing, their brain is still incredibly young, and you should think of it as a work in progress.

Your teen is going to seek new experiences as they grow and develop, but their brain can’t rationalize what they’re doing. Young people have a higher need for stimulation more so as they age. Inadvertently, new, exhilarating, and powerful encounters many times, transform into high-risk actions.

It’s difficult for a parent to deal with a child who is continuously seeking new stimulation. You won’t always be there to prevent them from doing crazy things or stop their friend’s suggestions to do something dangerous, just so they can “have fun.”

While painting graffiti on the local restaurant wall may seem like a bad idea, the gratification and temptation to “live a little” causes them to ignore the consequences.

5 Signs Your Teen is Dealing with Negative Peer Pressure

Regardless of all the people around your son or daughter, you’re still a powerful influence. While it appears that they are rebellious and not listening to what you have to say, they hear you. Now, whether they listen or not is another story.

It’s essential to stay involved in their lives so that you can help them make better choices. How do you know if your child is under peer pressure and may need help? Well, here are five warning signs to indicate an issue.

1. Sleep Habits Change

Sleep habits naturally change as your child ages. They will sleep more than ever when they hit those puberty years. However, when your child feels pressure from those around them, they can either sleep too much or too little.

You may notice signs like dark circles or bags under their eyes if they aren’t getting enough sleep. You may see their social media time increase as they are on it all night. If they are sleeping too much, you may have problems getting them out of bed or doing things they once loved.

These alterations in behavior can develop into depression if it goes on for too long. You must be careful because of peer pressure and bullying walk a fine line in some instances.

2. Loss of Appetite

Have you noticed a change in their weight? Are they eating too much or too little? A loss of appetite is not uncommon with someone who is under pressure or strain. If their weight plummets or takes a dramatic increase, then it could be a sign that there is emotional upset going on.

3. Moodiness

What teenager isn’t moody? However, you know your child better than anyone else. Hormonal fluctuations can cause Their moodiness, or it can be caused by being unhappy, not eating right, and not getting sufficient sleep. If you can’t even say “good morning” without them biting off your head, then you should investigate further.

4. Withdrawn

Social isolation is a big thing for teens as they develop and change. They may be socially withdrawn from the family and prefer to eat their dinner in their bedroom alone.

However, when you only see them for a few minutes each day, even though they don’t leave home, it’s a warning sign. It would be best if you interact with your child on some level each day.

5. They Have New Friends

Is your teen running with a new crowd? Usually, if there are significant changes in behavior or they become risk-takers, then new friends may be at the crux of the issue. If you’ve noticed that the friends they’ve had since elementary school don’t come around much anymore, you should question their absence.

A new crowd can bring about either a positive or bad influence. Consequently, if you see any of these signs that something is amiss, you can assume that the new friends aren’t the best of characters.

Here is what teenagers who inflict self-harm are trying to tell you.

Common Peer-Pressured Activities

Your child may be a level-headed person that uses common sense to make decisions. Sadly, when hormones begin to rage during puberty, they can be an emotional wreck and make questionable choices. They will push the limits as they try out new personas. Never assume that your teenager is immune from the influence of peers; they just need your positive influence to be stronger.

You know your child better than anyone, and you know if he or she is a leader or a follower. Some teens won’t be swayed by temptation, while others will follow their friends to say and do just about anything. It would help if you were on guard, and here are the five most common things your teen will feel pressured to do.

1. Shoplifting

Remember, teens need to feel an adrenaline rush. They may not need to steal that candy bar at the store, but it gives them the “rush” to do something dangerous. If your child has developed “sticky fingers,” then it could be a sign of pressure from peers.

2. Sexual Encounters

Since their hormones are raging and they are going through puberty anyway, it’s not uncommon for them to have sexual encounters. Sadly, they can use sex as an outlet for their frustration, which can lead to teen pregnancy. Parents need to be observant of abnormal sexual promiscuity as it can get teens in trouble.

3. Smoke, Vaping, Trying Drugs

You may remember smoking in the bathroom when you were in high school. Times change, but some problems remain the same. Smoking, vaping, and trying drugs is the number one temptation that your child will feel pressure to do.

4. Engaging in Risky Behaviors

Life is all about taking chances, but it may cause them to take more significant risks when it comes to the uncertainty of the teenage years. If you’ve noticed that your child is engaging in downright dangerous activities, outside influence could be blamed.

5. Bullying

If one teen starts picking on a peer, then others will jump on the bandwagon. Bullying is never okay, but your child may feel outside influences to torment or taunt another student.

IKEA’s Bully a Plant project proves the power of positivity can alter an outcome.

Final Thoughts: Prepare Your Teens for Peer Pressure Before It Happens

It’s essential to keep the communication lines open with your teenager. If you see any changes in behavior such as inappropriate language, clothing style alterations, social isolation, or disrespectfulness, then you need to keep an eye on them and their friends.

The truth is that if you keep a close relationship with your child that you can usually quickly spot problems and help steer them back in the right direction.

Business

Going Back to School at 30? How to Keep Working While You Learn

Going Back to School at 30? How to Keep Working


Going Back to School at 30? How to Keep Working While You Learn

Working full time and going to school full time is a lot for anyone to handle. Juggling school work with your job responsibilities and family responsibilities is a skill on its own. Going back to school at 30 might not seem like the easiest task to complete, but the feeling of accomplishment and success makes everything worth it. 

You’ve decided that going back to school is what you want to do, but you’re not sure if you can add college courses into your already-busy schedule. We’re here to tell you that you can and this guide below is going to tell you how. 

Continue reading to learn more!

Create a Healthy Balance

When you decide to add something into your busy schedule it can uncover anxiety and an overwhelming feeling. These feelings are normal, but with the right amount of balance, you can accomplish all of your goals without stressing yourself out. 

You’ll need to find a healthy balance between your work, school, and family/social life. The best way to do this is to find where you can cut back in certain areas. If you can cut a few hours at work but still remain full time, then do so. 

Be sure to dedicate specific times for school work and specific times for family and friends as well. 

Use Grants, Scholarships, or Loans

Taking college courses sometimes means cutting your work hours. If this is true for you, and you find yourself stressed out about losing money, then you can use your grants, scholarships, or loans to help you during this time.

When you’re rewarded grants or scholarships, this money will cover a portion of your tuition, the full amount of tuition, or the full amount plus money leftover in your pocket. If you do have money left over, then you can use it to help cover bills and you do not have to pay this money back. 

If you have money in your pocket from student loans, then you can use this money to help pay bills as well, but you’ll be required to pay it back after graduating. 

Make Time When You Can

It’s important to make time whenever you can to study. You can do this during your lunch breaks or even on the drive to or from work or school. Make recordings of yourself reading your notes or flashcards. 

You can listen to the recordings while driving. You can also consider waking up early to get in an hour or so of study time before starting your day. Make the time whenever you can find it without it affecting your daily routine. 

Consider Your Different Options

When starting college courses, you’ll have plenty of options to choose from. You can take courses in person, receive an online certification for a specific program like drug counseling, or do a mix of online and in-person courses. 

Online courses will save you time since you won’t have to commute, and you’ll have more flexibility when it comes to completing lessons and assignments. 

Going Back to School at 30 Is Challenging but Worth It!

Going back to school at 30 comes with more challenges than it would if you finished college at a younger age. The feeling of accomplishment that you’ll receive once done, however, is almost heightened when you’re able to do so at an older age with more obstacles to face.

Keep this guide in mind when you need that extra boost, and remember, you can do it!

For more posts similar to this one, visit us daily!

Business

I Need a Career, Stat! The Best Medical Careers That Don’t Require Medical School

I Need a Career, Stat! The Best Medical Careers That


I Need a Career, Stat! The Best Medical Careers That Don’t Require Medical School

Do you need a career change? Or, are you part of the 20-50 percent of college students who are having a hard time choosing a career path?

A career in the medical field is a great option if you’re looking for job stability and a great paycheck. But, what if you’re not interested in going to medical school? 

The good news is that you don’t have to be a doctor to work in the medical field. There are lots of medical careers that don’t require eight-plus years of schooling.

Read on to learn more about some of the best medical careers out there.

Benefits of Choosing a Career in the Medical Field

Why should you pursue a career in the medical field? There are lots of benefits that come with a medical career, and they go way beyond getting to wear cool scrubs like the ones in this collection.

Some other reasons to pursue a medical career include:

  • Massive industry growth
  • Job security
  • Great pay and competitive benefits
  • A challenging and stimulating work environment
  • Lots of opportunities for promotions and cross-training
  • Travel opportunities
  • Flexible hours

Of course, it’s also important to note that a job in the medical field can be incredibly rewarding. You’re always provided with opportunities to help others and make a difference in their lives. What could be better than that?

The Best Medical Careers

Okay, you’re convinced that a career in the medical field might be the right option for you. But, which career should you choose?

There are tons of different medical careers out there that don’t involve going to medical school. The following are some of the best ones you might want to consider:

Respiratory Therapist

Respiratory therapists help those who have difficulty breathing.

They care for patients who suffer from a wide range of respiratory conditions, including asthma and emphysema. They work with doctors to develop patient treatment plans, perform diagnostic tests, and teach patients how to properly use at-home treatments.

Respiratory therapists may also provide emergency care to patients who are suffering from heart attacks or other cardiac events. 

This career also requires a minimum of an associate’s degree.

Cardiovascular Technologist

As a cardiovascular technologist, you will work with physicians, nurses, and patients to take images and conduct a variety of tests. There are a number of specializations available within this field.

For example, you can work as an invasive specialist to perform cardiac catheterization. Or, you can work as a cardiopulmonary technologist and test and monitor patients’ breathing and lungs.

Cardiovascular technologists require a minimum of an associate’s degree in order to practice.

Registered Nurse

There are tons of nursing jobs available for registered nurses. If you want to care for others while earning a competitive salary, this is the career for you. 

As a registered nurse, you will be required to provide and coordinate patient care. You’ll also be in charge of educating patients and their families about a variety of health conditions while also providing advice and emotional support.

This career requires a minimum of an associate’s degree.

Registered Dietician

Are you interested in helping people eat healthfully and maintain a healthy lifestyle? If so, a career as a registered dietician might be for you.

As a registered dietician, your job will be to consult with patients and create meal plans to help them improve their health.

You can also work with health care institutions like hospitals and nursing homes to help them put together healthy menus.

Registered dieticians require a minimum of a bachelor’s degree.

Diagnostic Sonographer

Diagnostic sonography involves using ultrasound machines to detect a variety of conditions, including blood clots and heart conditions.

As a diagnostic sonographer, you can specialize in a variety of areas, such as cardiovascular health, abdominal health, or pediatric care.

In order to work in this field, you’ll need at least an associate’s degree.

Radiation Therapist

A radiation therapist treats patients who are suffering from cancer by administering various radiation treatments. These treatments include X-rays, CT scans, and Cone beam computed tomography scans.

You need a minimum of an associate’s degree to work as a radiation therapist. This career field is growing rapidly, and job availability is supposed to increase by 12 percent by the year 2026.

Occupational Therapy Assistant

Occupational therapy assistants work with occupational therapists to help clients improve their quality of life and maintain or regain their independence.

Occupational therapy assistants teach patients how to perform everyday tasks like tying their shoes, getting dressed, or carrying out household chores.

In order to work as an occupational therapy assistant, you need a minimum of an associate’s degree.

Physical Therapy Assistant

A career as a physical therapy assistant is similar to a career as an occupational therapy assistant. Except, of course, you’ll be assisting a physical therapist instead of an occupational therapist.

This career involves helping patients perform stretches and exercises in order to regain strength and range of motion, often after an injury or illness. Physical therapy assistants also perform treatments like ultrasound therapy and soft-tissue massage. 

You need a minimum of an associate’s degree to work as a physical therapy assistant.

Medical and Health Services Manager

There are also opportunities to work a more traditional office job while still working in the medical field.

As a medical and health services manager, you will plan, direct, and coordinate medical and health care services for specific departments or entire facilities. This career is also sometimes referred to as a healthcare executive.

In order to work in this field, you will need a minimum of a bachelor’s degree.

Looking for More Career Advice?

As you can see, a career in the medical field is a great option for folks who want to earn a steady income while helping others feel their best.

Do any of these medical careers appeal to you? Or, are you interested in learning about other career options?

If you want to pursue other careers, be sure to check out the careers and jobs section of our site today. There are tons of helpful articles here today that will help you make the right choice for yourself.